Sources and Notes

Sources and Notes for North Central Florida County Health Profiles 2017

County Health Rankings 2017

Health Outcomes

Source:
University of Wisconsin Population Health Institute, County Health Rankings, 2017.

Health Factors

Source:
University of Wisconsin Population Health Institute, County Health Rankings, 2017.

Population

Total Population

Source:
U.S. Census Bureau, 2011-2015 American Community Survey, Table B01001.

Notes:
These are estimates based on the five-year American Community Survey conducted by the U.S. Census Bureau.

Percent Population 65+ (%)

Source:
U.S. Census Bureau, 2011-2015 American Community Survey, Table B01001.

Notes:
These are estimates based on the five-year American Community Survey conducted by the U.S. Census Bureau.

Black Population (%)

Source:
U.S. Census Bureau, 2011-2015 American Community Survey, Table B02001.

Notes:
These are estimates based on the five-year American Community Survey conducted by the U.S. Census Bureau.

White Population (%)

Source:
U.S. Census Bureau, 2011-2015American Community Survey, Table B02001.

Notes:
These are estimates based on the five-year American Community Survey conducted by the U.S. Census Bureau.

Hispanic Population (%)

Source:
U.S. Census Bureau, 2011-2015 American Community Survey, Table B03003.

Notes:
These are estimates based on the five-year American Community Survey conducted by the U.S. Census Bureau.

Note that for the individual counties online version, race categories include:  White, Black, Asian and Other.  Hispanics are not part of the race category. Therefore Hispanic percentages should not be added with the race percentages to get the total population. The printed district report only includes selected races and ethnicity. The selected races and ethnicity cannot be added together to get the total population.

Socioeconomics

Median Household Income ($)

Source:
U.S. Census Bureau, 2011-2015 American Community Survey, Table S1903.

Notes:
These are estimates based on the five-year American Community Survey conducted by the U.S. Census Bureau.

Persons Below Poverty (%)

Source:
U.S. Census Bureau, 2011-2015 American Community Survey, Table C17002.

Notes:
These are estimates based on the five-year American Community Survey conducted by the U.S. Census Bureau.
For more information on federal poverty levels, visit: http://aspe.hhs.gov/poverty/13poverty.cfm

Persons Below Poverty 200% FPL (%)

Source:
U.S. Census Bureau, 2011-2015 American Community Survey, Table S1701.

Notes:
These are estimates based on the five-year American Community Survey conducted by the U.S. Census Bureau.
For more information on federal poverty levels, visit: http://aspe.hhs.gov/poverty/13poverty.cfm

Persons 25+ with H.S. Diploma or Higher (%)

Source:
U.S. Census Bureau, 2011-2015 American Community Survey, Table B15002.

Notes:
These are estimates based on the five-year American Community Survey conducted by the U.S. Census Bureau.

Lifestyle

Adults with Diagnosed Diabetes (%)

Source:
FloridaCHARTS.com, BRFSS Data, 2013, accessed June 23, 2015.

Adults Who Are Current Smokers (%)

Source:
FloridaCHARTS.com, BRFSS Data, 2013, accessed June 23, 2015.

Adults Who Are Overweight or Obese (%)

Source:
FloridaCHARTS.com, BRFSS Data, 2013, accessed June 23, 2015.

Access to care

Non-Elderly Uninsured (%)

Source:
U.S. Census Bureau, Small Area Health Insurance Estimates, 2015.

Medicaid Eligible (%)

Source:
FloridaCHARTS.com population estimates for 2017; Special Report from Florida Medicaid Office for Medicaid Eligibles, as of Jan. 1, 2017.

Notes:
The total population estimated for 2016 from FloridaCHARTS was used in the calculation.

Maternal and Infant Health

Teen Birth Rate 15-17 Years of Age

Source:
FloridaCHARTS.com maternal health query and population estimates for 2012-2014, accessed September 6, 2016.

Notes:
Teen Birth Rates are calculated by dividing the total number of births to moms 15-17 years of age by the total female population of the 15-17 year olds then multiplied by 1000.

Low Birthweight Babies (%)

Source:
FloridaCHARTS.com maternal health query and population estimates for 2013-2015, accessed September 6, 2016.

Notes:
This is the percent of live births that were low birthweight babies. Low birthweight babies are born weighing less than 2,500 grams.

Late or No Prenatal Care (%)

Source:
FloridaCHARTS.com maternal health query and population estimates for 2013-2015, accessed September 6, 2016.

Notes:
This is the percent of live births that had late or no prenatal care. Late or no prenatal care is defined as the care was started in the third trimester or no prenatal care was listed.

Infant Death Rate

Source:
FloridaCHARTS.com maternal health query and population estimates for 2013-2015, accessed September 6, 2016.

Notes:
Number of deaths during the first year of life per 1,000 live births in the same year or other time period.

Health Status

Cancer Incidence Rate

Source:
Florida Cancer Data System, population estimates query, 2014.

Notes:
Age adjusted rates are per 100,000 population. Cancer is defined as ICD 10 codes c00-c97. Incidence is the number of new cases per population in the time period.

New HIV Infection Cases Rate

Source:
Department of Health Division of Disease Control, Monthly Surveillance Report, January 2015 and January 2016; FloridaCHARTS.com, population estimates query, 2013-2015.

Notes:
Crude rates are per 100,000 population. The county numbers do not include Department of Corrections. Florida total does include the Department of Corrections total.

Preventable Hospitalizations Under Age 65

Source:
FloridaCHARTS.com, population estimates query, ambulatory care sensitive conditions query, 2013-2015, accessed May 26, 2017.

Notes:
Crude rates are per 100,000 population under 65 years of age.
For the complete listing of preventable hospitalization codes see: http://archive.ahrq.gov/data/safetynet/billappb.htm

Dental Emergency Room (ER) Visits Rate

Source:
AHCA Emergency Department Visit Data, 2012-2014; FloridaCHARTS.com, population query, 2012-14.

Notes:
Crude rates are per 1,000 total population. All dental ER visits are based on ICD 9 Codes between 520 and 529. All diagnosis and reason codes were checked. This data only includes emergency department visits in which emergency department registration occurs and the patient is not admitted for inpatient care at the reporting entity.

Mental Health Emergency Room (ER) Visits Rate

Source:
AHCA Emergency Department Visit Data, 2011-2013; FloridaCHARTS.com, population query, 2011-2013.

Notes:
Crude rates are per 1,000 total population. All mental health ER visits are based on ICD 9 Codes between 290 and 316. All diagnosis and reason codes were checked. This data only includes emergency department visits in which emergency department registration occurs and the patient is not admitted for inpatient care at the reporting entity.

Disparity: Black/White Mortality Rates

Source:
Department of Health, Office of Vital Statistics, 2013-2015.

Notes:
Numbers reflect the percent difference between the Black age-adjusted death rate and the White age-adjusted death rate for all causes of deaths. The percent difference is calculated by subtracting the White rate from the Black rate, dividing the difference by the White rate, then multiplying the result by 100. The White and Black age-adjusted mortality rates were calculated based on all causes of deaths.

Leading Causes of Deaths:  The number stated is the average number of deaths for the three year time period.

Heart Disease Mortality Rate

Source:
Department of Health, Office of Vital Statistics, 2013-2015.

Notes:
Age-adjusted death rates are per 100,000 population. Age-adjusted death rates are per 100,000 population. Heart Disease includes ICD 10 Codes: I00-I09, I11, I13, I20-I22, I24, I25-I28, I30-I31, I33-I38, I40, I42-I51.
For information on crude vs. age-adjusted mortality rates, see the end of this section.

Cancer Mortality Rate

Source:
Department of Health, Office of Vital Statistics, 2013-2015.

Notes:
Age-adjusted death rates are per 100,000 population. Cancer includes ICD 10 Codes: C00-C16, C18-C22, C25, C32-C34, C43, C50, C53-C56, C67, C70-C72, C81-C85, C88, C90-C96.
For information on crude vs. age-adjusted mortality rates, see the end of this section.

Chronic Lower Respiratory Disease (CLRD) Mortality Rate

Source:
Department of Health, Office of Vital Statistics, 2013-2015.

Notes:
Age-adjusted death rates are per 100,000 population. CLRD includes ICD 10 Codes: J40-J47.
For information on crude vs. age-adjusted mortality rates, see the end of this section.

Unintentional Injury Mortality Rate

Source:
Department of Health, Office of Vital Statistics, 2013-2015.

Notes:
Age-adjusted death rates are per 100,000 population. Unintentional Injuries includes ICD 10 Codes: V90-V99, W00-W19, W32-W34, W65-W74, X00-X09, X40-X49, Y85.
For information on crude vs. age-adjusted mortality rates, see the end of this section.

 

Notes on Crude vs. Age-Adjusted Death Rates:

Both the crude and the age-adjusted death rates are displayed in this report. Crude rates are the actual number of deaths for a given cause for a desired population divided by total number in the desired population and then multiplied by 100,000 to get the rate per 100,000 population. Age-adjusted death rates are crude rates adjusted to standardize the population distribution effects on the rate.

Although useful for certain purposes, the crude death rate as a comparative measure has a major shortcoming. It is a function of the age distribution of the population at risk. For example, the population at risk in one county may be primarily elderly persons ages 65 and older while the population at risk in another county may be primarily persons ages 40 to 50. Crude rates are recommended when a summary measure is needed and it is not necessary or desirable to adjust for other factors.

The frequency with which health events occur is almost always related to age. In fact, the relationship of age to risk often dwarfs other important risk factors. For example, acute respiratory infections are more common in children of school age because of their immunologic susceptibility and exposure to other children in school. Chronic conditions, such as arthritis and atherosclerosis, occur more frequently in older adults because of a variety of physiologic consequences of aging. Mortality rates tend to increase after the age of 40.

Because the occurrence of many health conditions is related to age, the most common adjustment for public health data is age adjustment. The age-adjustment process removes differences in the age composition of two or more populations to allow comparisons between these populations independent of their age structure.

The age-adjusted death rate is a summary measure that eliminates the effect of the underlying age distribution of the population. The result is a figure that represents the theoretical risk of mortality for a population if the population had an age distribution identical to that of a standard population. For example, a county’s age-adjusted death rate is the weighted average of the age-specific death rates observed in that county, with the weights derived from the age distribution in an external population standard, such as the U.S. population.

Age-adjustment allows for the comparison of two distinct populations (for example, Columbia County versus Florida) that most likely have differing age distributions. The age effects are in essence removed from the rates and the age-adjusted death rate no longer reflects the actual death rate but is an indicator rate that can be used for relative comparisons.

In the past, the National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS) age-adjusted rates using the U.S. 1940 standard population. Other agencies used the U.S. 1970 Standard. Beginning with 1999 data, federal agencies began age adjusting to the U.S. 2000 Standard Million Population.

 

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